Laurel’s Prize Tourney: Fiber Arts Part II

There were so many beautiful displays of fiber arts that it took more than one post to cover them all. Even so, I may have managed to miss someone. Stellar Event!

This artisan was absent from her table when I arrived to take photographs, but Jean Marie Laverriere’s delicately beaded linen caught my eye. I didn’t get to ask about the pretty pieces but it was easy to get a photo or two without anyone blocking my path.

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HL Miriam Armstrong attended with her mother. I liked the drum in the midst of the lovely stitching.

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Bertina Battista had a basket of colorful yarn that I so badly wanted to sink my hands into!! Lovely colors and they looked so soft.

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Emelisse de Loupey had displays about dyes and their effects. I failed to do a close-up of the framed portion of the display. I humbly apologize for that failure.

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This is the last of the artisans I collected as Fiber Arts. Short post, but the other was as long as I ever make them. So here, is the last, the work of: Ealasaid Mac al Bhaired (al Aeryn)

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This wraps up the Fiber Arts– unless I find pictures that I haven’t already put into one of the posts.  My eyes a blurry from staring at so many images, trying to guess which fit together and which artisan goes with which name.  As I said before, if you see an error, please let me know.

 

Laurel’s Prize Tourney: Fiber Arts Part I

Fiber Arts: such a vast array of arts are encompased by this name. There are those who begin with the wool, but a few begin with the sheep! Still others begin with the yarns, dying them to produce colors typical for the period.  Whether you grow the fibers or begin with a thread all ready to weave, the artists in this category make so much of the atmosphere of an event. Let us begin!

Here is Czina Angielcyzka whose rows of lovely woven trims stood out for me. Having tried my hand at making trim, my respect for those who have done multiple projects with a loom have my highest respect!

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This fiber arts table had a lot to offer. Sadly, I only managed a couple of close-ups before moving on. From lovely stiching to dyed wools, this colorful delight is the display of Aislynn ni Cahill:

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I caught this very colorful display by Eireann Hviturhrafn without the presence of the artisan. This is sad because it is both a fiber display and it seems some sort of food display.

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Judith de Saint Clare had another bright display. I especially liked that the table-cloth made all the items on it stand out, including her name tag.

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Safiya Spizega’s display of trims was delightful. She has some nice details in her work:

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Elsa von Schmmach displayed some lovely socks! I always love the period clothing that is difficult because it so rarely gets a mention in the records!

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This artisan must be known by her tag on her table for I fear there is a single key on my computer which refuses to work, and it is in her name!  Hetilda Corbett I do apologize for the error in your name.  Your wire work and weaving were lovely!

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This gentleman had a nice array of wool. I love wool. I took pictures of his wool. I took pictures of him with his wool. However, I failed to take a picture of the green tag with his name!!

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Eleanora Elizabeth Caley presented both clay pots and woven pieces. I did not know where to look! I took several pictures and I hope you enjoy them.

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WOOL!

I attended a meeting where we worked on garb and discussed our next SCA event. With encouragement, I cut out two tunics, one in blue wool to be my cold weather garb, and a child-sized tunic, patterned after a extant tunic in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum in NY and listed online with photographs.

The wool is blue. I washed it and shrunk it thoroughly. It has just enough yardage to make a left opening tunic. I got the idea from an article by Timothy Dawson that had drawings to accompany it.  I liked the design and thought it would make a good wool garment to use for those occasions when it is simply too cold for my usual layers of thin fabrics alone.

I have just enough left over for a rectangle to put around my shoulders when I don’t need but a little warmth. Next to get clasps and a cloak pin to close these things.

You shrink fabric before cutting so that later you can wash the resulting garment. I shrink in hot water, dry on high heat, repeat once, then I can use my machine’s cold water hand washing cycle if I need it.  This is going to be used like a coat, so will be unlikely to be worn very often so will rarely need washing.

If you ever want to do something worthy with disposable income, memberships to museums often will bring magazines, discounts for museum stores, and help to keep wonderful things available for everyone.